Quick and Simple Ways to Improve Your Bar Essays

A big complaint about essays: “Essays are so freaking subjective!”

Sure, the MBE is more “objective.” There’s only one right answer on the MBE.

But it depends on your interpretation of the question, the hypo, and most important, the answer choices. Yes because X? Yes because Y? Where’s the option for “yes because Z”? FML!

That’s a question for another day.

Let’s use the subjectivity of essays to your advantage. We’re going to take advantage of the impatience of a human who has thousands of shitty essays to read.

This is great because if you know how to write better on one, you know how to write better on all of them. How many points is that worth to you?

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How Do You Even Know You’re Practicing Correctly for Bar Prep?

Of course bar takers get lost when there are so many different ways to go about preparing.

You could try everything yourself, or you could find a few people you trust and ignore the rest.

I would rather pay someone I trusted literally 10x (or more) for insights I could apply, than information from 10 random people cobbled together. Just tell me what I need to know and the steps I need to take, dude!

Reason 1: Too much conflicting information actually STOPS you from doing anything.

Reason 2: I want the right insights, not just information. The information doesn’t even have to be perfect, as long as it makes sense to me and gets me to take action.

Reason 3: The more I respect the material (the more I pay), the more likely I am to do something with it.

How do you know whether to trust someone? Trust yourself to know.

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The Value of Redoing Problems (You’ll See Them Again on the Bar Exam)

Am I the only one who keeps a list of cringeworthy things they’ve done in the past? Anyone?

*crickets and random cough*

We learn our lessons by doing something and getting embarrassed and trying again. In fact, embarrassment is the best way I found to learn a lesson: actually doing things, realizing you did something wrong, feeling the pain, and using the pain to changing course in the future.

I’m not saying we should “make bad decisions” on purpose (#yolo). Life is already a constant stream of embarrassment anyway.

We simply need a willingness to endure embarrassment as fodder for our growth. Opening ourselves up to the possibility that we’re wrong.

Reprinted without permission
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